Spring Scarves!

The little Spring Elves have been busy! The  varied and colourful  towels have been taken down from our walls and the most amazing  display of  scarves and has taken it’s place! Louise O and her  minions have been tireless in their efforts to  show off our favorite scarves. Well done Ladies – yes that is a Capital “L”!!

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Guild Milestone!

It is a great feeling to announce that all our floor looms are currently warped! Even the tapestry loom is warped. Ladies, you are all amazing!

It’s remarkable, sometimes, how what seems like a disaster can end up being a blessing instead. In the spring of 2015 our guild found itself in the unfortunate position of having to find a new home. The rest of the spring and early summer were spent searching for a place to settle and a number of emergency meetings to keep our members informed of the progress. Luckily for us a seniors center had recently moved their pool tables to another area of the center and what was once a fairly spacious pool room was now available for rent. It was perfect – well, almost. Renovations were needed and the day the flooring company had to strip and sand the floor will stay in my mind for a very long time. In the end, after many hours of volunteer sweat equity and some professional skill, our guild room was ready. We were able to move in at the beginning of December and our lovely bookshelves were installed on Christmas Eve day.

I am happy to report that our group has adopted our new home wholeheartedly and has come to thrive. To our delight were we able to leave our looms up and working and still have a meeting in the space at the other end of the room. Each of our seven floor looms have been busy throughout the time since we moved in but this week we finally achieved a milestone moment. Every one of our floor looms and our tapestry loom is warped and has a project on the go. Our Swedish loom is warped for a rag rug, the 60-inch with a blanket warped with hand spun by Hannelore L . The Mecco has a scarf, the Fanny, a spring colour tea towel. The second stage of a twice woven rug graces one of our counter balance looms and the Artisat is sporting a bright colour gam tea towel. The 8-shaft Woolhouse loom has a wonderful sheep themed tea towel in progress.

With phone in hand I climbed up on a step ladder to capture the looms, using the pano setting so the angle is a bit odd, but the photos are ones I have been anxiously waiting to take. I want to thank our projects committee for all their hard work and our members for their enthusiasm and persistence. This did not happen out of the blue and it is a proud moment for us all.

 

If the  bottom 2 images are a bit off, I was standing on a ladder and used the pano setting on my cell phone. IMG_0829

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Here is the lovely blanket finally off the loom!

 

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3-Crayon Colour Challenge – Louise O. – Part 2

Louise O. managed to pull some pretty fantastic colours from the crayon bag and after weaving several scarves, took to a needle and thread.

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Temari is a centuries-old fibre art from Japan where threads are embroidered onto a tightly wound thread ball in very specific patterns. Part of the draw (and difficulty) of temari is it’s symmetry.

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Stitches can go in any direction because of the random wrapped thread surface of the ball. They are not limited to up and down, side to side and diagonally as with traditional stitchery.

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Kumihimo Helps

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This is Jairus. He’s in first grade. Sometimes he has trouble sitting still and paying attention. Sometimes he gets easily frustrated and has trouble expressing his emotions.

Jai likes to watch his aunt, Guild member Jordan N., spin and crochet. He’s enthralled with the workings of a spinning wheel and sometimes, Auntie Dodie, as he calls her, lets him help her treadle.

After seeing how interested he was in fibre art, Jordan set to thinking about what she could teach Jairus that would:

  1. Be easy enough for him to learn so as not to get him frustrated.
  2. Quick to do so he could see a result right away, and;
  3. Would hold his attention.

Jordan introduced Jairus to kumihimo—a Japanese form of braiding. At first, Jai wasn’t really interested in what Auntie Dodie showed him. He told her it wasn’t what he expected. But once she explained that he could weave a bracelet to give to someone, he perked up. After a brief explanation on how weaving works and a trick of counting through breakfast, lunch and supper instead of just 1, 2, 3, Jairus figured he could try the braid on his own.

He took to it right away and was fully prepared to skip supper in order to finish his little project. Through an evening, to everyone’s amazement, Jai was able to sit still and concentrate. To his own amazement, he was able to create something of his own.

What we do as fibre artists goes far beyond making textiles. Not only do we pass on our craft from generation to generation, but we have a simple tool in our hands that can make a far greater difference than simply clothing someone.

Jairus went home with a bag full of yarn. Mostly pink, because it’s it favourite. And red and purple—because they’re almost like pink. He also went home with a great sense of accomplishment and a new tool to help him cope with some of the intricacies life has thrown at him.